Education Restoration Preservation

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Healy Project

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Recent posts:

Event: A Great Dinner for a Good Cause

A Child’s View of T.P. Healy’s Family

Big Win for Healy Block Residents: Revised I-35W Expansion Plan

T.P. Healy: Farmer, Commission Merchant & Wholesale Grocer in Nova Scotia

Open April 25th: Restored 1885 House in Wedge

Learn from the Past, Learn from the Present

Grandstanding and Stonewalling at City Hall: Trashing the Public Trust

Orth House Demolition

An Open Letter to Minneapolis City Council Regarding the Orth House Demolition

The Truth Will Out II: More Lies That Brought Down 2320 Colfax Avenue South

The Truth Will Out: Lies that Brought Down 2320 Colfax Avenue South

Judge Denies Injunction against Wrecking 2320 Colfax Avenue South

Poisoning the Well: Testimony about 2320 Colfax Avenue South

“City Ghosts” Visit Victorian House

Historic North Wedge Walking Tour: Sunday, September 7th

Combining New and Old: A New Vision for the Orth House

A Place That Matters

Healy Project Files Suit to Stop Demolition of the Orth House

Happy Earth Day, Zero-Credibility City of Minneapolis

Stop Demolition: Allow a designation study for the Orth House

Perverting New Urbanism II: Greenwashing Demolition

Perverting New Urbanism for Fun and Profit

Size Matters: Development at Franklin-Lyndale

DEN$ITY: Building Utopia in Gopher City

Hypocrisy at City Hall: Planning Department Scorns Sustainable Development

Déjà Vu All Over Again: Threats to Healy Houses Renewed

Healy Project Special Kickoff Tour

Saving Private Houses

In Landmark Decision, City Council Stops Demolition of 2320 Colfax Avenue South

What’s the Greenest Building?

Who Lives in Lowry Hill East?

Revoltin’ Developments VI: What You Can Do

Revoltin’ Developments V: Sappy Citizens and Maudlin Attachments

Revoltin’ Developments IV: Density and City Planning

Revoltin’ Developments III: Density and Livability

Revoltin’ Developments II: Healy Houses in the Wedge

Revoltin’ Developments, Part I

Healy Descendant Acquires the Bennett-McBride House

On Memorial Day

Lost Healys on the Healy Block

More Lost Healys

The Broom House: 3111 Second Avenue South

More on Round Hill

Happy Birthday, T.P.

The Edmund G. Babbidge House: 3120 Third Avenue South

Brightening the Corner: 3101 Second Avenue South

2936 Portland Avenue

The Andrew H. Adams House: 3107 Second Avenue South

Clones: 2932 Park and 1425 Dupont North

The J.B. Hudson House: 3127 Second Avenue South

Second Healy Family Home: 3131 Second Avenue South

Schlocked: ‎2639-41 Bryant Avenue South

1976 Sheridan Avenue South: Preserved Exterior

The William L. Summer House, 3145 Second Avenue South

Two More in the Wedge

Weapon of Mass Healy Destruction: I-35W Construction

The Third: Healy Builds in the Wedge

The Second: 3139 Second Avenue South

Healy’s First House: 3137 Second Avenue South

Anders Christensen, T.P.Healy, and the Healy Project

Stop Demolition: Allow a designation study for the Orth House

Demand that Minneapolis, the “Zero Waste” City, allow the ordered designation study for the historic Orth House to be done.

2320
Last week the Minneapolis Zoning and Planning Committee, after listening to an hour of testimony, voted on a motion from CM Bender (Ward 10) to approve the owner’s appeal to demolish the Orth House, 2320 Colfax Ave. S. Lisa Goodman (Ward 7) was the lone dissenter. This vote overturned the decision of the Heritage Preservation Commission to allow the house interim protection (180 days) while a designation study is done. CM Bender must be called to account.

Last year the HPC declared the house to be an “historic resource” and the City Council unanimously upheld this decision. The owner, Michael Crow, and developer, Michael Lander, came back to the HPC this year, saying a designation study hadn’t been done and asking again for a permit to demolish an historic resource. The HPC reaffirmed their previous decision, and ordered a study.

Why wasn’t a designation study done? So far, we have no answer. The issue before the City Council is whether or not viable alternatives to demolition exist for the house. Ignoring the testimony of experts like architect John Cuningham (whose firm did the Uptown small area plan) and structural specialist John Jepsen, who both examined the house inside and out, CM Bender based her opinion on the testimony of those who would reap substantial financial gain from the house’s demolition: the owner, his broker, and the developer.

CM Bender declared that it is not feasible to rehab the house as a single-family home. No one testifying suggested that option, focusing instead on the need for affordable multi-family housing in the city. The owner, Michael Crow, declared that he has spent $250k on improvements to the house. City inspections records show that he spent less than $24k. Last year Crow’s broker, Tom Dunne, when asked directly if he marketed the property on residential MLS, said yes, but admitted this year that he has not. Is the Minneapolis City Council simply going to accept the claims of the owner and broker as fact? Shouldn’t all allegations by appellants be fact-checked by the City?

don't raze me, bro
The City Council should not be taking the word of the owner or developer, or anyone else, on faith. Unless the designation study is done, we have no way of knowing who is giving an accurate, fact-based assessment of the house. Since the vote last year, nothing has changed with the condition of the house or the City ordinances governing historic resources. Ask the CMs on Z&P who voted to grant the house protection last year to justify their change of position (Kevin Reich 1, Barbara Johnson 4). Ask the other CMs who voted last year to follow correct procedure and allow the designation study to go forward (Cam Gordon 2, Elizabeth Glidden 8, John Quincy 11). Copy Mayor Betsy Hodges, who served as CM Ward 13 last year. Ask the new CMs to let the study proceed. Send an e-mail to CM Goodman, thanking her for her support.
Let the City Council’s decision about the Orth House be based on verifiable facts, not the appellants’ unsupported allegations.
The full vote of the City Council on this motion will be held, without public hearing, on Friday, April 25th, at 9:30.
Contact city council members NOW and ask that the City follow correct procedure and allow the designation study to be done. Keep your message short and to the point. Request a response. For a list of current Council members, see http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/council/
green authentic_________________________________________________________
What the facts are:

Re: Sustainability. While the City is touting its “Zero-Waste” initiative, City Council is heading towards approving the demolition of a sound, historic house, sending 180+ tons of materials to the landfill. The City and the developer are using “trickle-down” sustainability, putting the responsibility on the project’s residents, who are expected to sell their cars, bike, use public transportation, and recycle.

Minneapolis, the Zero Waste city wants us to recycle and ride bikes--while the City sends hundreds of tons of historic houses to the landfill.

Minneapolis, the Zero Waste city, wants us to recycle and ride bikes–while the City sends hundreds of tons of historic houses to the landfill.

Re: Density. The developer claims that his so-called “Eco-flats” will provide needed density on transit hubs, a goal of the City Planning Dept. Density and transit hubs already exist in the Wedge. These amenities are there now, new development or not. The population of the Wedge is being increased by 47% by new development along the Greenway. How much density can the neighborhood absorb?
Re: Neighborhood support. The Lowry Hill East Neighborhood Association does not support the Lander development. A motion to approve the project did not pass the board. A survey of e-mails to the City regarding this issue shows overwhelming support for the house by residents with addresses in the Wedge.
Re: Affordability. Rent in new buildings, to be economically feasible for the developer, must be set at market rate or higher. The 1,800 new units in the Wedge are luxury housing. The Lander project will bring more gentrification, marketing to affluent white people. The affordable housing is the existing houses and apartments, not new construction. A perfect site for an apartment project is available at Franklin and Park. Why doesn’t the City urge Lander to build there, rather than facilitating the wrecking of an historic resource?
Re: Preservation. As noted in the 1981 article in Twin Cities magazine, 2320 Colfax is the transitional design in the career of celebrated master builder Theron Potter Healy. The Heritage Preservation Commission determined that the house is an historic resource. But the City thinks historic houses are worth saving only if they are in “good” neighborhoods. As CM Goodman observed, “This house will see an untimely death as a result of its location. If this was in Lowry Hill or Kenwood we would not be having this conversation.”

STOP DEMOLITION
Ask CMs to pay attention to the presentation of these facts at Z&P last week. Demand that the City follow protocol and allow the study ordered by the HPC to be completed.

Council Members by Ward:

1. kevin.reich@minneapolismn.gov, 2. cam.gordon@minneapolismn.gov, 3.jacob.frey@minneapolismn.gov, 4. barbara.johnson@minneapolismn.gov, 5.blong.yang@minneapolismn.gov, 6.abdi.warsame@minneapolismn.gov, 8.elizabeth.glidden@minneapolismn.gov, 9.alondra.cano@minneapolismn.gov, 10.lisa.bender@minneapolismn.gov,11. john.quincy@minneapolismn.gov, 12.andrew.johnson@minneapolismn.gov, 13. linea.palisano@minneapolismn.gov

Thank Lisa Goodman for her support 7.lisa.goodman@minneapolismn.gov

lowry hill healy

This Healy house, a design descendant of the Orth House, is on Lowry Hill.